National Drug Take Back Day October 27th

Posted on October 24, 2018 by admin


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Dear Friends and Neighbors,

This Saturday October 27th is National Drug Take Back Day. The Take Back Day is part of the DEA’s National Take Back Initiative to safely dispose of unwanted medications. There are opportunities to dispose of your unwanted medications in East Hampton, East Haddam and Colchester.

10am – 2pm

Chatam Acres East Hampton Housing Authority

20 East High Street, East Hampton

10am – 2pm

East Haddam Police Department

1 Plains Road, Moodus

Drug Collection Box

Colchester Resident Trooper’s Office

127 Norwich Avenue, Colchester

Help prevent over-the-counter (cough medicine, pain relievers, etc.) and prescription drug abuse by dropping off any unwanted, expired, or unused medicines, vitamins, or nutritional supplements. All medications must be in original containers, with all names crossed out.

**The service is free and anonymous, no questions will be asked**

No needles or sharps will be accepted.

Examples of sharps include:

Needles – hollow needles used to inject drugs (medication) under the skin

Syringes – devices used to inject medication into or withdraw fluid from the body Lancets, also called “fingerstick” devices – instruments with a short, two-edged blade used to get drops of blood for testing. Lancets are commonly used in the treatment of diabetes.

Auto Injectors, including epinephrine and insulin pens – syringes pre-filled with fluid medication designed to be self-injected into the body

Infusion sets – tubing systems with a needle used to deliver drugs to the body.

Connection needles/sets – needles that connect to a tube used to transfer fluids in and out of the body. This is generally used for patients on home hemodialysis.

Please take the time to share this information widely.

Rep. Ziobron Celebrates the Opening of a New 9-Town Transit Bus Route

Posted on October 19, 2018 by admin


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KILLINGWORTH – State Representative Mellissa Ziobron (R-34) joined state and local officials to usher in a new bus route for 9-Town Transit at a ribbon cutting ceremony on October 6th. The route extends from Madison to Middletown along Routes 1, 81 and 154 and launched August 27th.

9-Town Transit provides accessible transportation for residents to connect communities in the Connecticut River Valley with an annual ridership on 100,000. Schedules and fares can be found at www.9towntransit.com or by calling 860-510-0429.

East Haddam residents also have access to 9-Town Transit through Dial-A-Ride service throughout the town, the transit region and parts of Colchester and Westchester. More information about East Haddam’s service can be found online at www.easthaddam.org/Transportation-210339/.

DEEP and DCP Urge Tree Health Assessment

Posted on October 15, 2018 by admin


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The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and Department of Consumer Protection have recently released a notice urging homeowners to ‘make an assessment of risky dead trees’ while they still have leaves.

DEEP and DCP advise homeowners to look for the following:

Signs you have a risky dead tree

Most healthy hardwood trees would have retained their leaves until the end of September, while unhealthy or dead trees would have already shed or may have never produced leaves this growing season.  The lack of greenery during the growing season is clear indication a tree is dead and should be removed if it is a threat to property.

What you should do before hiring a contractor

  • Shop around: Get multiple quotes to ensure you are hiring the best person to work on your property.
  • Verify a contractor has the proper credential: Anyone making changes to your property, including removing trees, must have a home improvement contractor registration. If someone is doing more detailed work such as correctively pruning a tree, or doing other work associated with prolonging a tree’s life, they must have an Arborist’s license from DEEP.
  • Have a contract: Home improvement contractors are required to have a written contract with you before work may begin.

** It will be helpful to know how long the work is anticipated to take, the costs, the final outcome and what responsibilities you may have in the process**

  • Ask for references: Ask your potential contractor for references from homeowners who have had that contractor do tree removal work on their property.
  • Be aware of scams: Avoid contractors who display signs of being a scammer.

**If you have a complaint regarding a home improvement contractor that you haven’t been able to resolve by contacting that individual or business, you are encouraged to file a complaint with DCP by emailing dcp.complaints@ct.gov**

According to DEEP and DCP, starting in 2015, Connecticut experienced three consecutive years of expanding Gypsy moth caterpillar defoliation caused by dry springs.  This drought inhibited a moisture dependent soil fungus that solely impacts gypsy moth caterpillar from emerging. In addition, the statewide establishment of Emerald ash borer is causing extensive ash mortality.

Connecticut has been long recognized as having the highest WUI indices in the United States. WUI otherwise known as the Wildland-Urban Interface, is a term that recognizes the proximity of peoples’ homes to forests, wetlands and grasslands. A common term used in fire prone areas of the US, many are surprised at Connecticut’s WUI ranking which is caused by a high percentage of tree canopy cover over a densely populated area. WUI helps explain why so many Connecticut residents are impacted by forest pest outbreaks and severe storms.