Proudly Representing Fairfield and Southport


Rep. Kupchick Update: Walk with Jake & Friends

Posted on October 12, 2018 by rjoslyn


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Dear Friends,

I’m excited to announce I’m working on the committee for the very first Walk with Jake & Friends Dog Walk in Fairfield on October 21st.

Conceived as a way to both support the Fairfield Police Department’s K9 unit and raise awareness for veterans living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Walk with Jake will be a fun day for people and dogs alike, as K9 Jakes leads a dog walk on Jennings Beach.

K9 Jake is named in honor of USMC Lance Corporal Jake Pettit, a Fairfield native and Combat Veteran who tragically passed away in 2016 after struggling with PTSD.  Since then, the FPD K9 unit has been dedicated to both serving the Fairfield community and bringing awareness to PTSD.

We are planning a costume contest, a police K9 demonstration, giveaways, pizza, music, and there will be food trucks and rescues on site, as well.

 

October 21, 2018

11:00 AM

Jennings Beach (880 South Benson Road, Fairfield)

 

11:00 – Registration

11:45 – Costume Contest

12:00 – Pet Blessing followed by Walk

12:45 – K-9 Demonstration and Pizza

To pre-register for Walk with Jake, you can find a form here.

For updates about this event, you can follow the Walk with Jake & Friends Facebook page.

I hope I will see you at this fun family event that raises money for Fairfield’s K9 Unit, which is funded solely through private donations, while showing our commitment to veterans suffering from PTSD.

Rep. Kupchick Newsletter: Assessing the Governor’s $10 Million Toll Study

Posted on July 23, 2018 by rjoslyn


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Dear Friends,

As you may have heard, Governor Malloy last week announced he is requesting $10 million in borrowed money to pay for a study on the impact of electronic tolling in Connecticut.

Toll legislation has been considered by the General Assembly each of the past five years, but it has never received enough votes to pass either chamber because of significant public opposition to putting another financial burden on cash-strapped Connecticut residents.

In the face of that opposition, the governor issued an Executive Order requiring the DOT to prepare a toll proposal and study how much it would cost commuters.  However, I don’t think we need a study to show the implications of tolls because they are obvious – it will make living in Connecticut even more unaffordable than it already is.

While I believe our infrastructure needs to be improved and modernized, I cannot support an additional scheme to collect even more money from Connecticut residents until the state conducts a serious re-evaluation of how it prioritizes the transportation funding we already collect, how the state can more accurately calculate the costs of transportation projects, and a real transportation funding “lockbox” is instituted.

The state already allocates funding for transportation from two gas taxes, the tax on out-of- state trucks, one half point of the CT sales tax, the sales tax on new cars, all sorts of fees, and borrowed money.  We should be reducing the tax burden on families and businesses, not increasing it.

My caucus has sent a proposal to Governor Malloy to address our transportation needs without imposing tolls – proposals that have been ignored.

To that point, I would like to share with you a letter my colleagues – House Minority Leader Themis Klarides and Finance Committee Ranking Member Chris Davis – wrote to the governor asking him to remove the request from the Bonding Commission’s agenda.

I stand with my colleagues in urging the Bond Commission to refuse the governor’s $10 million request as well.

The Commission is scheduled to meet on July 25.

Click on the image below to read the full letter:

 

Please do not hesitate to contact my office if you have questions about items on the State Bond Commission agenda or any other state issue.

Rep. Kupchick Calls on Governor to Remove $10 Million Toll Study from Bond Commission Agenda

Posted on July 23, 2018 by rjoslyn


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HARTFORD – State Representative Brenda Kupchick (R-132) today urged the State Bond Commission to reject an item bonding $10 million for a study on the impact of a plan to implement electronic tolling on Connecticut highways.  The agenda item would borrow money to pay for the study, as required by an Executive Order from Governor Dan Malloy who chairs the Bond Commission and decides which items are on the agenda.

The study would explore tolls on all major Connecticut highways, including Interstates 95, 91, and 84, along with the Merritt and Wilbur Cross parkways.  This past spring, the legislature refused to consider a similar study costing only $5 million.

“It is completely inappropriate for the governor to attempt to circumvent the legislature like this,” said Rep. Kupchick.  “The governor is requesting to borrow $10 million in taxpayer money – which, unbelievably, is twice the amount we had seen proposed in the legislature for a similar idea – to study the impact tolls would have on Connecticut residents.  However, if you drive on I-95 or the Merritt Parkway every day you do not need a study to know that tolls would make life in Connecticut even more unaffordable than it is now.  That is why I am joining my colleagues in urging the State Bond Commission to refuse the governor’s request and remove this item from the agenda.

“I kept an open mind on tolls when the issue first came before the legislature, but as more details of the proposals were presented it has become obvious this would simply be just another tax.”

Rep. Kupchick referred to data offered by the CT Department of Transportation that estimated approximately 70% of toll revenue would come from Connecticut residents.  She also pointed to previous DOT tolling proposals that had called for up to 80 tolling gantries across the state, far exceeding the 14 toll locations in Connecticut before they were decommissioned in the 1980s.  These proposals are expected to cost commuters between $3,000 and $6,000 per year with additional costs for businesses.

“While I believe our infrastructure needs to be improved and modernized, and that charging motorists for using our highways makes some degree of sense, I cannot support an additional scheme to collect even more money from Connecticut residents until the state conducts a serious re-evaluation of how it prioritizes the transportation funding we already collect and how to more accurately calculate the costs of transportation projects,” added Rep. Kupchick.  “Further, a governor with less than 5 months left in office should not be permitted to make a $10 million appropriation that the legislature has already rejected.”

The State Bond Commission is scheduled to meet on Wednesday, July 25.