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Rep Wood: Update on Veto Session

Posted on June 28, 2018 by rjoslyn


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This past week, the General Assembly was called back to the Capitol for a veto session.

Governor Malloy had vetoed seven bills that had passed both chambers with broad bipartisan support. These included bills to help families and taxpayers by scaling back the scope of the Hartford bailout deal, extending tax credits to manufacturers, and preventing the governor from making mid-year cuts to school districts.

Majority Party leadership announced its intention to convene for a veto session, signaling their intent to override the governor’s vetoes on these key pieces of legislation.  Legislative Democrats changed their minds on these bills and did not vote to override any of the vetoes.

Since an override vote requires at least 2/3 support in each chamber, all 7 of Governor Malloy’s vetoes were sustained by the Democrats in the legislature.

I would like to highlight the following vetoed bills which the legislature had an opportunity to override:

PA 18-35: This bill prevented the governor from making mid-year cuts to Education Cost Sharing grants.  Among my top priorities for this session, this law was intended to ensure the governor could not use his executive authority to withhold education funding from municipalities in the middle of the school year, as has become his habit in recent years. Municipal leaders, administrators, and teachers all need stability and predictability in order to help students succeed, and cuts in the middle of the school year make that so much harder – no matter how much funding a town gets. Although this bill was overridden by the House, Senate Democrats stood with the governor and allowed the veto to stand.

PA 18-157: This bill would have scaled back the bailout of the City of Hartford that the governor secretly negotiated with municipal leaders.  The legislature approved certain special aid for Hartford, but the governor’s agreement promised aid for 20 years. Our Democratic colleagues agreed with us that this was outrageous and we passed this bill limiting the aid. Senate Democrats again stood with the governor to sustain the veto.

For more information about the 2018 session and all seven of the bills the governor vetoed, here is a link to the Office of Legislative Research analysis.

As always, please contact me by email at terrie.wood@cga.ct.gov if you have questions about this veto session or any other state issue.