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Rep. Frey Supports Budget Fixes that Clarify Funding for Renters’ Rebate Program

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HARTFORD – State Rep. John Frey (R-111) voted in favor of language that clarified the portion of the recently adopted state budget addressing the Renters’ Rebate program.  The changes ensure that the program will be implemented the same way in the same way it was prior to the passage of the budget and qualified renters will continue to receive their rebate checks.

The Renters’ Rebate program is a state law that provides a reimbursement for Connecticut renters who are elderly or totally disabled, and whose incomes do not exceed certain limits. In the law, persons renting an apartment or room, or living in cooperative housing or a mobile home may be eligible for this program. Renters’ rebates can be up to $900 for married couples and $700 for single persons.

Prior to the revisions, the state appropriation for the Renters’ Rebate program was reduced by approximately half, with towns expected to cover the rest of the cost. With the changes, the state will fully fund this program as before and reduce towns’ municipal aid amounts by half of the amount of rebate checks in each town.

Rep. Frey said that 69 Ridgefield residents participate in the Renters’ Rebate program.

“Several renters in Ridgefield and people who care for them expressed their concerns about this portion of the budget to me over the last month, and understandably so because of the importance of these rebate checks in their lives and the cost it would impose on municipalities,” said Rep. Frey.  “The good news for municipalities is that, ultimately, this leaves them in a better position than when the budget passed, because the original version of the budget would have required towns to cover the entire cost of the Renters’ Rebate program.  With these municipal aid reductions, they are essentially only paying for less than half of the program.”

The House and Senate each called Sino die, which officially ends all special sessions for the year.

“It was encouraging to see this oversight taken care of as we finally gaveled out of session for the year, so that we can start to turn the page to next year, when we will have a lot of work to do if we want to keep making progress on resolving our crippling fiscal crisis,” added Rep. Frey.