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Reps. Devlin & Kupchick, Sen. Hwang Point to Historic Nature of Occasion as Republican Budget Passes Both Chambers of General Assembly

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Urges Governor to Sign Budget Bill into Law “as Soon as Possible” 

HARTFORD – State Representatives Laura Devlin (R-134) and Brenda Kupchick (R-132) along with State Senator Tony Hwang (R-28) expressed cautious optimism at the passage of the Republican budget through both chambers of the General Assembly late Friday night.

After three Democratic State Senators broke ranks and voted for a GOP budget amendment, which passed the Senate earlier that afternoon, the House passed the same Republican budget bill by a 77-73.  It now heads to the governor’s desk to be signed into law, although it is possible he will use his veto power to block it from becoming law.

“Taxpayers have had enough. People and businesses continue to flee Connecticut for more affordable, lower tax states. We need to break the never-ending tax increase cycle and get our state back on a path to prosperity. Today’s historic vote was an opportunity to come together as state lawmakers for the better of Connecticut. This budget takes the first major steps in turn our state around,” said Rep. Laura Devlin.

“Our plan moves Connecticut in a new direction,” Sen. Hwang said. “We want to generate a predictable, sustainable and transparent ecosystem where Connecticut businesses can thrive and grow. We can do it with no new taxes.  Time is of the essence to protect our schools, our communities and our most vulnerable and at-risk residents.”

After the Republican budget passed the State Senate, Governor Malloy declared his intention to veto the budget bill passed by the General Assembly.  The Fairfield legislators urged the governor to reconsider, citing the “draconian” effects his executive order could have on local education and other state services.

The budget crisis in Connecticut is currently in its third month.  Should the governor block passage of this budget bill, it is unlikely the state will adopt a budget prior to the October 1 deadline for education payments and the governor’s executive order would take effect.

“This is a watershed moment for our state, as the legislature has indicated its willingness to reject the fiscal policies of recent years and take a new approach to budgeting that will change our current course and set us on path to recovery,” said Rep. Kupchick.