Proudly Representing Fairfield and Trumbull.


Rep. Laura Devlin: Heat Kills’ Signs goes up in Trumbull

Posted on August 8, 2018 by jdooley


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditmail

 Brings Safety Awareness to Community

TRUMBULL – State Reps. Laura Devlin (R-134), David Rutigliano (R-123) and Ben McGorty (R-122) along with Trumbull First Selectwoman Vicki Tesoro, the Trumbull Police Department and Trumbull Public Works Department, the Stop and Shop management team and members of Trumbull Animal Group (TAG) were present for the unveiling of the newest ‘Heat Kills – If you love ’em, don’t leave ’em’ awareness program sign installed at the entrance to the Stop and Shop Plaza off of Quality Road.

Last summer, the Trumbull State Representatives kicked this Public Safety Awareness Program to remind residents about the dangers of leaving children and animals in cars. The goal is recruit businesses throughout Trumbull put up signage and window stickers to spread the word about keeping children and animals safe.

Within the last week, Rep. Devlin has received word from the Westfield Mall in Trumbull that they will also display ‘Heat Kills’ signage in the mall parking lot.

Rep. Devlin said, “These ‘Heat Kills – If you love ’em, don’t leave ’em’ signs and stickers give people an easy way to call the Trumbull police if they see a child or pet in a hot car while they are out around town. I want to thank Stop and Shop for participating in this awareness program.”

‘This is great community program that will save lives. I ask anyone out there to use their good judgment and protect the welfare of your children and pets,” said Rep. Rutigliano.

First Selectwoman Vicki Tesoro said, “This is an important public service program for the Town of Trumbull sponsored by our State Representatives and I support any initiative that helps keep our children and pets safe.”

 

McGorty said, “I will continue to work with my colleagues to recruit businesses to put signs and stickers at their businesses as a public safety reminder.”

All three legislators said they supported a bill this legislative session which gives immunity to any ‘Good Samaritan’ who enters the car by force and protects the ‘Good Samaritan’ against any potential civil damages or criminal penalties when rendering aid.

State Rep. Devlin Opposes Gov. Malloy Tolls Study

Posted on July 17, 2018 by jdooley


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditmail

Today, Governor Malloy determined that he is the only branch of government that matters and has thwarted the will of the state legislature and the people of Connecticut.

During the last session, the pro-tolls forces lacked the necessary votes in the General Assembly to push through a tolls plan or a proposal to study tolls which would lead to implementation.

So instead Governor Malloy today used his executive power today to call on CT DOT to study implementing tolls in CT and using $10 million in taxpayers dollars to do it. He plans to borrow the $10 million.

I call on the State Bond Commission which meets on July 25th to reject this request for toll study funds.

A governor with 5 months left in office should not be permitted to make a $10 million appropriation that the legislature has already rejected.

Rep. Devlin, Fairfield Legislators Vote to Override Governor’s Veto of Bill Preventing Mid-Year Cuts

Posted on June 26, 2018 by jdooley


Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditmail

HARTFORD – State Representatives Brenda Kupchick (R-132) and Laura Devlin (R-134) voted on Monday to override Governor Dan Malloy’s veto of a bill prohibiting future governors from making cuts to education aid in the middle of a fiscal year.  State Senator Tony Hwang (R-28) also voted to override the veto in the Senate.

Although there was enough support in the House on a 103-33 vote margin to override the governor’s veto, the override effort failed to achieve 2/3rd support in the Senate and was ultimately unsuccessful, meaning Governor Malloy’s veto will stand.  The legislature also failed to override vetoes on several other pieces of legislation that passed this year when Senate Democrats sided with Governor Malloy.

Public Act 18-35 was legislation intended to impede a Connecticut governor from withdrawing Education Cost Sharing funds already promised to a municipality for the school year, and was a key priority for the legislators.

“Fairfield schools and social service programs have been routinely targeted for the governor’s mid-year education holdbacks that cause uncertainty for town officials and local school boards.  I was proud to stand with my colleagues in the House for taking a positive step towards predictability and stability,” said Rep. Kupchick.  “Unfortunately, Governor Malloy and his allies in the legislature are still major roadblocks to progress in our state.  I’m very disappointed the majority in the Senate decided to not stand up against the governor’s vetoes.  In addition to stopping education cuts in the middle of the school year, these were bills that would have reduced the taxpayer bailout of Hartford, offered incentives for manufacturing companies and created an animal abuser registry.”

“Governors – Malloy and future ones – need to be put on notice that making unilateral mid-year cuts to education funding can devastate our communities.  Reductions during the fiscal year are particularly difficult and leave few options for administrators and teachers,” said Rep. Devlin. “I was proud to cast a vote to override the governor’s veto. Unfortunately, the Senate Democrats refused to join us today in protecting our children’s educational priorities.”

“I voted to override Governor Malloy, and I did so on behalf of Fairfield educators, children and families,” Sen. Hwang said.  “I was proud to stand in opposition to the governor on this crucial school funding issue. This bill would have created stability and predictability for Fairfield beyond the current budget.  I was pleased to see the governor’s ill-advised veto get overridden in the House.  Shortly after the House’s override, I was bitterly disappointed to see many Senate Democrats reverse their prior votes.  There were not enough votes for the bill to get to the finish line in the State Senate.  That’s truly a shame, but I can promise Fairfield’s taxpayers this:  I am not deterred, and I will continue to stand with in support of common sense policies like this one.”

All seven of the governor’s vetoes were sustained in a special session of the General Assembly on Monday.