Rep. Davis Updates Seniors on MSP Funding

Posted on January 18, 2018 by admin


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EAST WINDSOR – State Representative Christopher Davis visited the East Windsor Housing Authority’s Park Hill community on Tuesday to provide residents and staff with a legislative update and to listen to their concerns regarding issues impacting the state of Connecticut.

“Many of our seniors live on fixed incomes, and rely on critical state services that help them make ends meet,” said Rep. Davis. “We recently went back into special session to restore the funding to the Medicare Savings Program that helps seniors and individuals with disabilities pay their medical bills. During these difficult budget times, we need to restructure state government in ways that it helps the most people in need.”

Rep. Davis told the seniors and the staff that Governor Dan Malloy has threatened to veto the bipartisan vote to restore the funding to Medicare Savings Program (MSP), shortly after the meeting Governor Malloy vetoed the lawmakers’ decision.

“We came together this month and overwhelming restored funding to the Medicare Savings Program,” added Rep. Davis. “It doesn’t make any sense for the Governor to veto an action by the General Assembly that passed both chambers with veto-proof majorities. We anticipate that we will be returning to Hartford to override the Governor’s veto, and I will continue to work hard this session to extend funding for this program past July.”

On January 9th, Rep. Davis voted for a bipartisan plan the provided funding for the Medicare Savings Program through the end of the fiscal year. Among the methods used to restore program funding is a requirement that Gov. Malloy reduce the number of managers and consultants—a provision included in the adopted budget ignored by the governor. Other components include moving human resources-related functions of some state agencies into the state’s Department of Administrative Services and requiring the governor to find savings in Executive Branch functions while limiting his ability to cut more than 10 percent from any one program.

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